Nuclear Medicine

Cardiac Stress Testing

Nuclear cardiac stress tests are used for a variety of purposes. The following are some of the most common reasons for this test:

  • Determine the level of blood flow to the heart by detecting blockages in the arteries
  • Check for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)
  • Test how well a patient’s heart responds to stress
  • Assess the level of damage done to the heart following trauma such as a heart attack
  • Identify the cause of chest pains (angina)
  • Monitor the effectiveness of treatments used to improve blood flow to the heart

The nuclear stress test occurs in two phases: the rest phase and the stress test.

The Rest Phase

During the rest phase, a small amount of radioactive liquid (called a tracer) will be injected into the bloodstream through a small needle in the hand or arm. About an hour later, a special camera will take pictures of the heart to capture how the tracer moves through the arteries.

The Stress Test

The second phase of your test may occur either the following day, or a few hours after the rest phase. During the stress test phase, a small needle will be placed in a vein on your arm or hand and attached to an IV. To help the tracer move quickly throughout the body and to the heart, a medication is given to imitate the effects of stress by dilating blood vessels. An hour later, pictures of the heart will be taken again to assess the movement of blood throughout the heart.

During your nuclear cardiac stress test, a nuclear technologist or registered nurse will be monitoring you at all times, and a physician will be present.

After the Exam

Images are  reviewed by one of our radiologists/nuclear medicine physician for interpretation. Results are sent to your Health Care Provider and you will be able to discuss the results of your exam with them.

Nuclear Bone Scan

A bone scan is a nuclear medicine imaging test that uses bone-seeking radioactive materials or tracers and a computer to create an image of the skeleton. A bone scan looks at the bones to see if there are any abnormalities or problems in the skeletal system.  It can be used to determine the source of unexplained bone pain, as well as to identify issues such as arthritis, infection, avascular necrosis, cancer, and fractures or injuries. Bone scans are also done to assess the effectiveness of cancer treatment or determine if cancer has spread to the bones.  Bone scans are able to show lesions or abnormal areas of the bones 6-12 months before these issues would appear on an x-ray.

During your bone scan, a radioactive tracer will be injected into a vein in your hand or arm. The tracer will travel through the blood and collects in bone, especially in areas of increased activity (where the bone may be growing, breaking down, or repairing itself). You will be asked to lay very still on a table while the gamma camera moves back and forth over your body to capture the images.

After the Exam

Images are  reviewed by one of our radiologists/nuclear medicine physician for interpretation. Results are sent to your Health Care Provider and you will be able to discuss the results of your exam with them.

Click the exam preparation button below to find out what is required prior to your scheduled exam.

Nuclear Medicine Locations

Tecumseh Medical Centre (Front Building)
  • 13278 Tecumseh Rd. E. Suite 10, Tecumseh N8N 3T6
  • MON – FRI: 8:00am – 5:00pm

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519-256-4914

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519-256-4914

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Friday: 8am - 5pm

Saturday: 8am - 12pm

1568 Ouellette Ave., Windsor, ON N8X 1K7

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